Importing old articles from LowPlastic.com

It has been three years since I’ve added anything to my plastic-use reduction blog, LowPlastic.com, and the domain expires today. I’ve woved the old content to here and will tagging it — if I can — “low plastic.”

If I write anything else on the subject, it will be there.

Art store run!

Went by the Utrecht art supplies store. Loose pencil (also china markers and colored pencils, in lieu of markers), gum erasers, metal rulers, gummed paper tape and a wide variety of paper supplies — all without additional plastic or extra packaging.

Which is why I think of the art stores as good office supplies stores.

Brass brads keep papers together

OK: three posts in the last 2 years is a pretty poor result. I’ll try to do better.

Now some plastic reduction. I bought these brass brads to keep papers together. They’re fun and remind me of elementary school book reports and high school plays. Inexpensive, reusable and not a bit of plastic.

Water, before the hurricane

This photo, of any empty bottle water aisle in Washington, D.C. is a bit disappointing, if completely predictable.

My solution, based on more than a few times through a hurricane, is to keep a covered dutch oven full of water on the stove, the electric kettle full and a pitcher in the fridge. And I’ll doubt I’ll have to depend on those.

I also make sure all the outstanding dishes and clothes are washed. (Clean clothes are no substitute for a shower should there be a real shutdown, but it does make making-do happier.)

Be safe.

Beth Terry speaking at BlogHer

Beth Terry — she of Fake Plastic Fish — is speaking at BlogHer this weekend. Congratulations!

But what drew my attention to this was a thread of basic advice for reducing convention plastic waste through her Twitter feed. I was already primping for “bring your own badge holder” but her “Water bottles are great, but mugs are more versatile!” tweet ┬áis that amazing mix of plainly obvious and really useful.

So be sure to follow both her blog and Twitter feed.

“The Story of Bottled Water”

A great video; a follow up to The Story of Stuff. The video is more than eight minutes long, so I suspect it’s use is best for those who are already convinced to make a case, rather than sugesting your indifferent friends to watch it.

The matching site also has other resources, including an annotated script.